Development of the Drosophila entero-endocrine lineage and its specification by the Notch signaling pathway

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Abstract

In this paper we have investigated the developmental-genetic steps that shape the entero-endocrine system of Drosophila melanogaster from the embryo to the adult. The process starts in the endoderm of the early embryo where precursors of endocrine cells and enterocytes of the larval midgut, as well as progenitors of the adult midgut, are specified by a Notch signaling-dependent mechanism. In a second step that occurs during the late larval period, enterocytes and endocrine cells of a transient pupal midgut are selected from within the clusters of adult midgut progenitors. As in the embryo, activation of the Notch pathway triggers enterocyte differentiation and inhibits cells from further proliferation or choosing the endocrine fate. The third step of entero-endocrine cell development takes place at a mid-pupal stage. Before this time point, the epithelial layer destined to become the adult midgut is devoid of endocrine cells. However, precursors of the intestinal midgut stem cells (pISCs) are already present. After an initial phase of symmetric divisions which causes an increase in their own population size, pISCs start to spin off cells that become postmitotic and express the endocrine fate marker, Prospero. Activation of Notch in pISCs forces these cells into an enterocyte fate. Loss of Notch function causes an increase in the proliferatory activity of pISCs, as well as a higher ratio of Prospero-positive cells. © 2011.

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Takashima, S., Adams, K. L., Ortiz, P. A., Ying, C. T., Moridzadeh, R., Younossi-Hartenstein, A., & Hartenstein, V. (2011). Development of the Drosophila entero-endocrine lineage and its specification by the Notch signaling pathway. Developmental Biology, 353(2), 161–172. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2011.01.039

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