Diagnosis and 2-year outcomes of endoscopic treatment for ischiofemoral impingement

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Abstract

Purpose The purposes of this study were to investigate the clinical and radiographic presentation of patients with ischiofemoral impingement (IFI) and to assess the outcomes of endoscopic treatment with partial resection of the lesser trochanter. Methods: Five patients with IFI who underwent endoscopic treatment with partial resection of the lesser trochanter were retrospectively reviewed. The outcomes were assessed at a mean follow-up of 2.3 years (range, 2 to 2.5 years) through the modified Harris Hip Score and a visual analog scale score for pain. Physical examination tests provoking the impingement between the lesser trochanter and ischium were used for the diagnosis of IFI, including the IFI test and reproducible pain lateral to the ischium with the long-stride walking test. The presence of quadratus femoris muscle edema and a decreased ischiofemoral space on magnetic resonance imaging was also necessary for the diagnosis. Results: The mean modified Harris Hip Score increased from 51.3 points (range, 34.1 to 73.7 points) preoperatively to 94.2 points (range, 78.1 to 100 points) at the final follow-up (P =.003). The mean visual analog scale score for pain decreased from 6.6 (range, 6 to 7.3) before surgery to 1 (range, 0 to 4) at the final follow-up (P =.001). The mean duration to return to sport after surgery was 4.4 months (range, 1 to 7 months) for the 5 patients in this study. No complication was observed. Conclusions: The endoscopic treatment of IFI was effective at 2 years in 5 patients with consistent clinical and imaging diagnostic findings. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic case series.

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Hatem, M. A., Palmer, I. J., & Martin, H. D. (2015). Diagnosis and 2-year outcomes of endoscopic treatment for ischiofemoral impingement. Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery, 31(2), 239–246. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2014.07.031

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