Dietary acrylamide exposure in male F344 rats: Dataset of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation markers

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Abstract

We previously reported that dietary acrylamide, at doses (10 and 50 mg/kg diet) known to cause rodent tumors, lowered serum total high density lipoprotein and total testosterone, increased serum lipase, and lowered lymphocytes levels together with other hematological parameters in male F344 rats exposed for 10 weeks (doi: 10.1016/j.etap.2014.11.009 [1]). Here we present data related to the role of food-borne acrylamide exposure (at 0, 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg diet) in the presence of low (7% wt/wt) or high (23.9% wt/wt) dietary fat on serum and urinary markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in F344 rats. Briefly, urine and serum samples were collected from the experimental animals a day prior to or at the time of necropsy, respectively and processed for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay estimations of biochemical markers. Urine samples were analyzed for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and isoprostane, and serum samples for total antioxidant capacity, paraoxonase 1 activity, c-reactive protein, homocysteine, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, thromboxin 2, and Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine.

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Jin, X., Coughlan, M., Roberts, J., Mehta, R., & Raju, J. (2016). Dietary acrylamide exposure in male F344 rats: Dataset of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation markers. Data in Brief, 7, 460–467. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2016.02.024

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