The diet-heart hypothesis: A critique

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Abstract

The low-fat "diet-heart hypothesis" has been controversial for nearly 100 years. The low-fat-high-carbohydrate diet, promulgated vigorously by the National Cholesterol Education Program, National Institutes of Health, and American Heart Association since the Lipid Research Clinics-Primary Prevention Program in 1984, and earlier by the U.S. Department of Agriculture food pyramid, may well have played an unintended role in the current epidemics of obesity, lipid abnormalities, type II diabetes, and metabolic syndromes. This diet can no longer be defended by appeal to the authority of prestigious medical organizations or by rejecting clinical experience and a growing medical literature suggesting that the much-maligned low-carbohydrate-high-protein diet may have a salutary effect on the epidemics in question. © 2004 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

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Weinberg, S. L. (2004, March 3). The diet-heart hypothesis: A critique. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Elsevier USA. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2003.10.034

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