No difference in hypertension prevalence in smokers, former smokers and non-smokers after adjusting for body mass index and age: A cross-sectional study from the Czech Republic, 2010

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Abstract

© 2015 Pankova et al. Background: Several hypotheses suggest a temporary increase in blood pressure following smoking cessation. This may be the result of endocrine changes (e.g. alteration in adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol levels in post-cessation period) and/or post-cessation weight gain. Our aim was to identify factors that may be associated with the diagnosis of hypertension after quitting smoking. Methods: In 2010, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in a sample of 2065 Czech adults, chosen by quota selection and representative according to age, gender, education, region of residence and the size of settlement, aged 18 to 94 years. We examined the association between age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, and education with the hypertension diagnosis in their personal history. Data were compiled and weighed by age categories. Statistical significance was measured by Pearson Chi-square test at the level of significance 95 %. Results: Diagnosis of hypertension was reported in 461 (22 %) subjects, with no difference by gender. Based on univariate analysis, former smokers were more likely than non-smokers to be diagnosed for hyp ertension (OR 1.450 (1.110-1.900), p = 0.006). However, after adjusting for body mass index and age, the occurrence of hypertension diagnosis did not differ among non-smokers, smokers and former smokers (OR 0.760 for smokers, p = 0.082 and OR 1.020 for former smokers, p = 0.915). Conclusion: We did not find any differences in hypertension diagnosis prevalence according to smoking status.

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Pankova, A., Kralikova, E., Fraser, K., Lajka, J., Svacina, S., & Matoulek, M. (2015). No difference in hypertension prevalence in smokers, former smokers and non-smokers after adjusting for body mass index and age: A cross-sectional study from the Czech Republic, 2010. Tobacco Induced Diseases, 13(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12971-015-0049-4

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