Exploring the degradation capability of Trametes versicolor on selected hydrophobic pesticides through setting sights simultaneously on culture broth and biological matrix

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Abstract

Pesticides introduced inadvertently or deliberately into environment by global agricultural practices have caused growing public concern, therefore the search of approaches for elimination of such xenobiotics should be motivated. The degradation of hydrophobic pesticides including chlorpyrifos, dicofol and cypermethrin were assayed with the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor. Experiments were set at realistic concentration as 5 μg L−1, and both culture medium and biologic matrix were analyzed for pollutants residues. Results showed that the first step was due to a fast adsorption, which also played an important role, accounting for more than 90% removal in average. Then mass balances proposal evidenced the biodegradation of the adsorbed pollutants, demonstrating efficient depletion as 94.7%, 87.9% and 93.1%, respectively. Additionally, the related degradation metabolites were identified using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry. Two compounds, namely O,O-diethyl thiophosphate and diethyl phosphate were detected as transformation products of chlorpyrifos, whereas dicofol was degraded into benzaldehyde that is first time to be reported. It also confirms the degradation capability of T. versicolor. Our results suggest that T. versicolor is a potential microorganism for bioremediation of hydrophobic pesticide contaminated environments.

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Hu, K., Peris, A., Torán, J., Eljarrat, E., Sarrà, M., Blánquez, P., & Caminal, G. (2020). Exploring the degradation capability of Trametes versicolor on selected hydrophobic pesticides through setting sights simultaneously on culture broth and biological matrix. Chemosphere, 250. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2020.126293

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