Coping with Stress in the Forced Repatriation of Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Refugee Children among Swedish Police Officers and Social Workers

  • Sundqvist J
  • Ghazinour M
  • Padyab M
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Abstract

Police officers and social workers are key actors in the forced repatriation of unaccompanied asylum-seeking refugee children. Police officers are tasked with arranging the children's departure, whereas social workers are responsi-ble for the children's well-being during their stay in Sweden. To gain a better understanding of how to handle stressors and cope effectively with forced re-patriation work, the current study aimed to describe and compare police of-ficers' and social workers' coping strategies for forced repatriation work, con-trolling for sociodemographic characteristics and social support. Nationally distributed surveys to social workers (n = 380) and police officers (n = 714) with and without experience of forced repatriation were used, analyzed by univariate and multivariable regression models. The police officers used more planful problem-solving and self-controlling strategies, whereas the social workers used more escape-avoidance, distancing and positive reappraisal coping. Additionally, social workers with experience in forced repatriation used more planful problem-solving than those without experience. Police of-ficers involved in forced repatriation manage their work stress via adaptive coping strategies and control over the situation, whereas social workers use more maladaptive coping strategies. Concrete tools are needed at the individ-ual level to strengthen key actors' ability to support the well-being of unac-companied asylum-seeking refugee children.

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APA

Sundqvist, J., Ghazinour, M., & Padyab, M. (2017). Coping with Stress in the Forced Repatriation of Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Refugee Children among Swedish Police Officers and Social Workers. Psychology, 08(01), 97–118. https://doi.org/10.4236/psych.2017.81007

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