Assessment of attitudes and practices of young Malaysian adults about antibiotics use: A cross-sectional study

16Citations
Citations of this article
82Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Objective: The present study was aimed to evaluate the practices and attitudes of young Malaysian adults towards the use of antibiotics, and to determine the socioeconomic factors associated with the antibiotic use. Methods: A survey was carried in Cheras community by approaching a conveniently selected sample of 480 participants. A pre-tested questionnaire was used for data collection. Result: Of 480 participants approached, 400 agreed to participate in this study, giving a response rate of 83.3%. The study results showed that 42.75% of the participants exhibited poor attitudes towards antibiotic usage. Chinese race and high income were significantly associated with the positive attitudes towards antibiotic usage. It is shown that the practice of the participants towards antibiotics was relatively poor. The majority of participants agreed that they do not consult a doctor for minor illnesses (64%). The main reason for not consulting a doctor was the high fees of consultation (34.25%) and the inconvenience of visit (29.25%). However, a large proportion of respondents (77.5%) agreed that there is a need to enhance antibiotic education among public. Conclusion: The study results identified some crucial gaps in the attitudes and practices of Cheras community about the use of antibiotics. Thus, improving the public knowledge and changing their attitude towards antibiotic use along with proper interventions to regulate the ease of their availability would play a significant role for the effective use of antibiotics in the community.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Hassali, M. A., Arief, M., Saleem, F., Khan, M. U., Ahmad, A., Mariam, W., … Syed, I. A. (2017). Assessment of attitudes and practices of young Malaysian adults about antibiotics use: A cross-sectional study. Pharmacy Practice, 15(2). https://doi.org/10.18549/PharmPract.2017.02.929

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free