Does the store-turnover method still provide a useful guide to food intakes in aboriginal communities?

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Abstract

Objective: To consider the application of the store-turnover method as a guide to assess food intake in remote Aboriginal communities. Method: Food sources in a remote Aboriginal island community were documented. The contribution of quantifiable food sources to total community-level fresh fruit and vegetable availability was determined. Results: The store remains the single largest supplier of fruit and vegetables overall (54%), however its contribution varies depending on the subpopulation of interest. A store-turnover alone may significantly underestimate community-level dietary intake, depending on the contribution of other food sources. Conclusions: Changes in the food supply in remote communities, coupled with methodological complexities inherent in the store-turnover method, challenge its application in a contemporary context. Implications: A simplified version of the store-turnover method is needed that could be widely applied by community people and health practitioners seeking to initiate and monitor interventions to improve diet quality.

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Brimblecombe, J., Mackerras, D., Clifford, P., & O’Dea, K. (2006). Does the store-turnover method still provide a useful guide to food intakes in aboriginal communities? Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 30(5), 444–447. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-842X.2006.tb00461.x

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