Assessing the reliability of the five minute speech sample against the Camberwell family interview in a chronic fatigue syndrome sample

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Abstract

Purpose The current study aimed to examine the reliability of the Five Minute Speech Sample (FMSS) for assessing relative Expressed Emotion (EE) compared with the Camberwell Family Interview (CFI) in a sample of relatives of adult patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Method 21 relatives were recruited and completed both assessments. The CFI was conducted first for all participants, with the FMSS conducted approximately one month later. Trained raters independently coded both EE measures; high levels of rating reliability were established for both measures. Comparisons were conducted for overall EE status, emotional over-involvement (EOI) and criticism. Findings The distribution of high and low-EE was equivalent across the two measures, with the FMSS correctly classifying EE is 71% of cases (n = 15). The correspondence between the FMSS and CFI ratings was found to be non-significant for all categorical variables. However, the number of critical comments made by relatives during the FMSS significantly correlated with the number of critical comments made during the CFI. The poorest correspondence between the measures was observed for the EOI dimension. Conclusion The findings suggest that the FMSS may be a useful screening tool for identifying high-EE, particularly criticism, within a sample of relatives of patients with CFS. However, the two measures should not be assumed equivalent, and the CFI should be used where possible, particularly with respect to understanding EOI.

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Band, R., Chadwick, E., Hickman, H., Barrowclough, C., & Wearden, A. (2016). Assessing the reliability of the five minute speech sample against the Camberwell family interview in a chronic fatigue syndrome sample. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 67, 9–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2016.02.006

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