Development of a calcium phosphate nanocomposite for fast fluorogenic detection of bacteria

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Abstract

Current procedures for the detection and identification of bacterial infections are laborious, time-consuming, and require a high workload and well-equipped laboratories. Therefore the work presented herein developed a simple, fast, and low cost method for bacterial detection based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with a nutritive mixture and the fluorogenic substrate. Calcium phosphate ceramic nanoparticles were characterized and integrated with a nutritive mixture for the early detection of bacteria by visual as well as fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The composite was obtained by combining calcium phosphate nanoparticles (Ca:P ratio, 1.33:1) with a nutritive mixture of protein hydrolysates and carbon sources, which promote fast bacterial multiplication, and the fluorogenic substrate 4-methylumbellipheryl-β-D-glucuronide (MUG). The composite had an average particle size of 173.2 nm and did not show antibacterial activity against Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria. After an Escherichia coli suspension was in contact with the composite for 60-90 min, fluorescence detected under UV light or by fluorescence spectrophotometer indicated the presence of bacteria. Intense fluorescence was observed after incubation for a maximum of 90 min. Thus, this calcium phosphate nanocomposite system may be useful as a model for the development of other nanoparticle composites for detection of early bacterial adhesion.

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Martínez, C. R., Rodríguez, T. L., Zhurbenko, R., Valdés, I. A., Gontijo, S. M. L., Gomes, A. D. M., … Cortés, M. E. (2014). Development of a calcium phosphate nanocomposite for fast fluorogenic detection of bacteria. Molecules, 19(9), 13948–13964. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules190913948

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