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Ventilatory acclimatisation is beneficial for high-intensity exercise at altitude in elite cyclists

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Abstract

Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between ventilatory adaptation and performance during altitude training at 2700 m. Methods: Seven elite cyclists (age: 21.2 ± 1.1 yr, body mass: 69.9 ± 5.6 kg, height 176.3 ± 4.9 cm) participated in this study. A hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) test and a submaximal exercise test were performed at sea level prior to the training camp and again after 15 d at altitude (ALT15). Ventilation (VE), end-tidal carbon-dioxide partial pressure (PETCO2) and oxyhaemoglobin saturation via pulse oximetry (SpO2) were measured at rest and during submaximal cycling at 250 W. A hill climb (HC) performance test was conducted at sea level and after 14 d at altitude (ALT14) using a road of similar length (5.5–6 km) and gradient (4.8–5.3%). Power output was measured using SRM cranks. Average HC power at ALT14 was normalised to sea level power (HC%). Multiple regression was used to identify significant predictors of performance at altitude. Results: At ALT15, there was a significant increase in resting VE (10.3 ± 1.9 vs. 12.2 ± 2.4 L·min−1) and HVR (0.34 ± 0.24 vs. 0.71 ± 0.49 L·min−1·%−1), while PETCO2 (38.4 ± 2.3 vs. 32.1 ± 3.3 mmHg) and SpO2 (97.9 ± 0.7 vs. 94.0 ± 1.7%) were reduced (P

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APA

Townsend, N. E., Gore, C. J., Ebert, T. R., Martin, D. T., Hahn, A. G., & Chow, C. M. (2016). Ventilatory acclimatisation is beneficial for high-intensity exercise at altitude in elite cyclists. European Journal of Sport Science, 16(8), 895–902. https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2016.1139190

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