Echocardiographic findings in systemic amyloidosis: Spectrum of cardiac involvement and relation to survival

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Abstract

One hundred thirty-two patients with biopsy-proven systemic amyloidosis underwent echocardiographic examination to define the spectrum of cardiac involvement. Echocardiographic abnormalities were then correlated with clinical variables and survival at follow-up. Patients were subgrouped by left ventricular wall thickness: Group I, mean wall thickness 12 mm or less; Group II, mean wall thickness greater than 12 mm but less than 15 mm; Group III, mean wall thickness 15 mm or greater; or Group IV, atypical features such as wall motion abnormalities or left ventricular dilation. Patients with greater wall thickness had a higher frequency of associated echocardiographic abnormalities such as left atrial enlarge ment or granular sparkling appearance on two-dimensional examination and, more commonly, reduced systolic function. The occurrence of clinical congestive heart failure was strongly correlated with greater wall thickness and multiple other echocardiographic abnormalities. Survival was negatively influenced both by greater wall thickness and reduced systolic function. The median survival of the entire group was 1.1 years. Echocardiographic examination is an important tool for establishing the presence of cardiac amyloid involvement and may be useful in estimating prognosis in such patients. © 1985, American College of Cardiology Foundation. All rights reserved.

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APA

Cueto-Garcia, L., Reeder, G. S., Kyle, R. A., Wood, D. L., Seward, J. B., Naessens, J., … Tajik, A. J. (1985). Echocardiographic findings in systemic amyloidosis: Spectrum of cardiac involvement and relation to survival. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 6(4), 737–743. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0735-1097(85)80475-7

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