DNA fingerprinting and anti-inflammatory activity of Ocotea bullata bark from different locations

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Abstract

Ocotea bullata was sampled from forests at Mhlahlane, Zimankulu, Saasveld and Bangeni Weza. The bark of this plant is frequently used as a fine powder to treat headache, urinary disorders and stomach problems. Old and young bark, twigs and coppice were tested for anti-inflammatory activity. The COX-1 inhibition of hexane extracts from the old bark samples showed low inhibition in this assay. There was little variation in activity between extracts from the different collection sites as well as between plants from the same region. The TLC fingerprints also revealed very little chemical variation between old bark material from the different locations as well as between plants from the same region. DNA was extracted from young leaves only as older ones rapidly turned brown during the extraction process. There were no genetic differences, within and across the different habitats, detected with the six RAPD primers that were selected for use. Copyright © NISC Pty Ltd.

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APA

Madubanya, L. A., Jäger, A. K., Makunga, N. P., Geldenhuys, C. J., & Van Staden, J. (2005). DNA fingerprinting and anti-inflammatory activity of Ocotea bullata bark from different locations. South African Journal of Botany, 71(1), 38–44. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0254-6299(15)30146-0

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