Efeito de exercícios físicos e de lazer sobre os níveis de cortisol plasmático em pacientes com Aids

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Abstract

The advent of antiretroviral drugs for the treatment of AIDS individuals provided an increase in survival time, however, despite having the patient is often asymptomatic, can present significant disturbances in psychosocial sphere, among them, the weakening of social relations, which are lose with the discovery of the contamination. Regular physical exercise can be an interesting strategy to combat the psychological problems associated with HIV infection. Individuals engaged in a physical training program may have improved well ‐being, increased self‐esteem, decrease in symptoms of depression and anxiety, but also provide greater social interaction. Patients infected with HIV generally have higher baseline serum cortisol and some studies suggest that high levels of cortisol can impair the function of the immune system, acting as accelerators of viral progression and development of AIDS. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of physical exercise and leisure on plasma cortisol levels in patients with AIDS. Selected patients were divided into two groups: Group I participated in physical activity and exercise Group II participated in leisure activities, both for a period of 16 weeks. The evaluation consisted of measurement of plasma cortisol before the start of activities and after 16 weeks. 57% of patients showed improvement in the levels of plasma cortisol after the program applied. This work suggests that physical exercise and leisure induce a physiological improvement cortisol response in patients with AIDS.

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Pupulin, A. R. T., Herold, P., Monteiro, M. A., Romancini, J. L. H., & Pimentel, G. G. de A. (2016). Efeito de exercícios físicos e de lazer sobre os níveis de cortisol plasmático em pacientes com Aids. Revista Brasileira de Ciencias Do Esporte, 38(4), 328–333. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rbce.2014.04.001

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