The Effect of Race and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease on Long-Term Survival after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

  • Efird J
  • O’Neal W
  • Anderson C
  • et al.
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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a known predictor of decreased long-term survival after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Differences in survival by race have not been examined.<br /><br />METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted of CABG patients between 2002 and 2011. Long-term survival was compared in patients with and without COPD and stratified by race. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using a Cox regression model.<br /><br />RESULTS: A total of 984 (20%) patients had COPD (black n = 182; white n = 802) at the time of CABG (N = 4,801).The median follow-up for study participants was 4.4 years. COPD was observed to be a statistically significant predictor of decreased survival independent of race following CABG (no COPD: HR = 1.0; white COPD: adjusted HR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.7-2.3; black COPD: adjusted HR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1-2.2).<br /><br />CONCLUSION: Contrary to the expected increased risk of mortality among black COPD patients in the general population, a similar survival disadvantage was not observed in our CABG population.

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APA

Efird, J. T., O’Neal, W. T., Anderson, C. A., O’Neal, J. B., Kindell, L. C., Ferguson, T. B., … Kypson, A. P. (2013). The Effect of Race and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease on Long-Term Survival after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting. Frontiers in Public Health, 1. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2013.00004

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