Effect of Silicon on Growth and Development of Strawberry under Water Deficit Conditions

1Citations
Citations of this article
5Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Water stress is a major factor that limits agricultural crop production. Silicon (Si) is generally considered as a beneficial element for the growth of higher plants, especially for those grown under stressful environment. This study was conducted to examine the effects of Si on growth and development of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa ‘Camarosa’) under water stress conditions. A factorial experiment, in a completely randomized design, was used to investigate the effects of three irrigation levels and four Si treatments consisting of 0, 5, 10, and 15 mmol·L −1 potassium silicate (K 2 SiO 3 ). The results showed that an increase in the levels of water stress caused a decrease in most of the quantitative characteristics such as specific leaf area, chlorophyll fluorescence, net photosynthesis rate, and stomata conductance; addition of Si significantly increased most of the mentioned factors; water stress increased electrolyte leakage, proline, and water use efficiency (WUE); Si treatment significantly decreased transpiration rate and improved chlorophyll content and WUE. Water stress stimulated mineral nutrient absorption whereas Si application decreased it under water stress. In conclusion, it was found that in most of the investigated factors, 10 mmol·L −1 potassium silicate had the best effect on growth and development of strawberry. Besides, Si application had beneficial effects on strawberry plants and the addition of it could alleviate water stress.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

DEHGHANIPOODEH, S., GHOBADI, C., BANINASAB, B., GHEYSARI, M., & SHIRANIBIDABADI, S. (2018). Effect of Silicon on Growth and Development of Strawberry under Water Deficit Conditions. Horticultural Plant Journal, 4(6), 226–232. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hpj.2018.09.004

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free