Effects of Secondhand Smoke Exposure on the Health and Development of African American Premature Infants

  • Brooks J
  • Holditch-Davis D
  • Weaver M
  • et al.
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Abstract

Objective . To explore the effects of secondhand smoke exposure on growth, health-related illness, and child development in rural African American premature infants through 24 months corrected age. Method . 171 premature infants (72 boys, 99 girls) of African American mothers with a mean birthweight of 1114 grams. Mothers reported on household smoking and infant health at 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months corrected age. Infant growth was measured at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, and developmental assessments were conducted at 12 and 24 months. Results . Thirty percent of infants were exposed to secondhand smoke within their first 2 years of life. Secondhand smoke exposure was associated with poorer growth of head circumference and the development of otitis media at 2 months corrected age. Height, weight, wheezing, and child development were not related to secondhand smoke exposure. Conclusion . Exposure to secondhand smoke may negatively impact health of rural African American premature infants. Interventions targeted at reducing exposure could potentially improve infant outcomes.

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APA

Brooks, J., Holditch-Davis, D., Weaver, M. A., Miles, M. S., & Engelke, S. C. (2011). Effects of Secondhand Smoke Exposure on the Health and Development of African American Premature Infants. International Journal of Family Medicine, 2011, 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1155/2011/165687

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