No effects of whole-body vibration training on muscle strength and gait performance in persons with late effects of polio: A pilot study

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Abstract

Objective To evaluate the feasibility and possible effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) training on muscle strength and gait performance in people with late effects of polio. Design A case-controlled pilot study with assessments before and after training. Setting A university hospital rehabilitation department. Participants People (N=5; 3 men, 2 women; mean age, 64±6.7y; range, 55-71y) with clinically and electrophysiologically verified late effects of polio. Interventions All participants underwent 10 sessions of supervised WBV training (standing with knees flexed 40°-55° up to 60 seconds per repetition and 10 repetitions per session twice weekly for 5 weeks). Main Outcome Measures Isokinetic and isometric knee muscle strength (dynamometer), and gait performance (Timed Up & Go, Comfortable Gait Speed, Fast Gait Speed, and six-minute walk tests). Results All participants completed the 5 weeks of WBV training, with no discernible discomfort. No significant changes in knee muscle strength or gait performance were found after the WBV training period. Conclusions This pilot study did not show any significant improvements in knee muscle strength and gait performance following a standard protocol of WBV training. Thus, the results do not lend support to WBV training for people with late effects of polio. © 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.

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Brogrdh, C., Flansbjer, U. B., & Lexell, J. (2010). No effects of whole-body vibration training on muscle strength and gait performance in persons with late effects of polio: A pilot study. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 91(9), 1474–1477. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2010.06.024

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