Electrodialytic transport properties of anion-exchange membranes prepared from poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinyl alcohol-co-methacryloyl aminopropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride)

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Abstract

Random-type anion-exchange membranes (AEMs) have been prepared by blending poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and the random copolymer-type polycation, poly(vinyl alcohol-co-methacryloyl aminopropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride) at various molar percentages of anion-exchange groups to vinyl alcohol groups, Cpc, and by cross-linking the PVA chains with glutaraldehyde (GA) solution at various GA concentrations, CGA. The characteristics of the random-type AEMs were compared with blend-type AEMs prepared in our previous study. At equal molar percentages of the anion exchange groups, the water content of the random-type AEMs was lower than that of the blend-type AEMs. The effective charge density of the random-type AEMs increased with increasing Cpc and reached a maximum value. Further, the maximum value of the effective charge density increased with increasing CGA. The maximum value of the effective charge density, 0.42 mol/dm3, was obtained for the random-type AEM with Cpc = 4.2 mol % and CGA = 0.15 vol %. A comparison of the random-type and blend-type AEMs with almost the same Cpc showed that the random-type AEMs had lower membrane resistance than the blend-type ones. The membrane resistance and dynamic transport number of the random-type AEM with Cpc = 6.0 mol % and CGA = 0.15 vol % were 4.8 Ω cm2 and 0.83, respectively.

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Jikihara, A., Ohashi, R., Kakihana, Y., Higa, M., & Kobayashi, K. (2013). Electrodialytic transport properties of anion-exchange membranes prepared from poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinyl alcohol-co-methacryloyl aminopropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride). Membranes, 3(1), 1–15. https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes3010001

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