Electrospun Poly(L-lactide)/Poly(ε-caprolactone) Blend Nanofibrous Scaffold: Characterization and Biocompatibility with Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

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Abstract

The essence of tissue engineering is the fabrication of autologous cells or induced stem cells in naturally derived or synthetic scaffolds to form specific tissues. Polymer is thought as an appealing source of cell-seeded scaffold owing to the diversity of its physicochemical property and can be electrospun into nano-size to mimic natural structure. Poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) are both excellent aliphatic polyester with almost "opposite" characteristics. The controlling combination of PLLA and PCL provides varying properties and makes diverse applications. Compared with the copolymers of the same components, PLLA/PCL blend demonstrates its potential in regenerative medicine as a simple, efficient and scalable alternative. In this study, we electrospun PLLA/PCL blends of different weight ratios into nanofibrous scaffolds (NFS) and their properties were detected including morphology, porosity, degradation, ATR-FTIR analysis, stress-stain assay, and inflammatory reaction. To explore the biocompatibility of the NFS we synthesized, human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) were used to evaluate proliferation, attachment, viability and multi-lineage differentiation. In conclusion, the electrospun PLLA/PCL blend nanofibrous scaffold with the indicated weight ratios all supported hASCs well. However, the NFS of 1/1 weight ratio showed better properties and cellular responses in all assessments, implying it a biocompatible scaffold for tissue engineering. © 2013 Chen et al.

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Chen, L., Bai, Y., Liao, G., Peng, E., Wu, B., Wang, Y., … Xie, X. (2013). Electrospun Poly(L-lactide)/Poly(ε-caprolactone) Blend Nanofibrous Scaffold: Characterization and Biocompatibility with Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells. PLoS ONE, 8(8). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0071265

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