Elimination of Bloodstream Infections Associated with Candida albicans Biofilm in Intravascular Catheters

  • Akbari F
  • Kjellerup B
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Abstract

Intravascular catheters are among the most commonly inserted medical devices and they are known to cause a large number of catheter related bloodstream infections (BSIs). Biofilms are associated with many chronic infections due to the aggregation of microorganisms. One of these organisms is the fungus Candida albicans. It has shown to be one of the leading causes of catheter-related BSIs. The presence of biofilm on intravascular catheters provide increased tolerance against antimicrobial treatments, thus alternative treatment strategies are sought. Traditionally, many strategies, such as application of combined antimicrobials, addition of antifungals, and removal of catheters, have been practiced, but they were not successful in eradicating BSIs. Since these fungal infections can result in significant morbidity, mortality, and increased healthcare cost, other promising preventive strategies, including antimicrobial lock therapy, chelating agents, alcohol, and biofilm disruptors, have been applied. In this review, current success and failure of these new approaches, and a comparison with the previous strategies are discussed in order to understand which preventative treatment is the most effective in controlling the catheter-related BSIs.

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Akbari, F., & Kjellerup, B. (2015). Elimination of Bloodstream Infections Associated with Candida albicans Biofilm in Intravascular Catheters. Pathogens, 4(3), 457–469. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens4030457

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