Emotional intelligence and the eye of the beholder: Comparing self- and parent-rated situational judgments in adolescents

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Abstract

A situational judgment test of emotion management was administered to 382 eighth-grade students with typical-performance instructions (i.e., " What would you do in this situation?" ). The emotion management test was also administered to a parent of each student in an observer-judgment format (i.e., " What would your child do in this situation?" ). Compared to self-evaluations, parent-evaluations showed: (a) lower means, (b) higher correlations with Extraversion and lower correlations with Agreeableness, (c) lower correlations with intelligence, and (d) about equal prediction of criteria. In combination with a relatively low correlation between self- and parent-evaluations (. r=. .19), results suggest that self- and other-judgments may measure substantively different constructs. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

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MacCann, C., Wang, L., Matthews, G., & Roberts, R. D. (2010). Emotional intelligence and the eye of the beholder: Comparing self- and parent-rated situational judgments in adolescents. Journal of Research in Personality, 44(5), 673–676. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrp.2010.08.009

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