Encephalitis caused by an unusual human herpes virus type 6 and Toxoplasma gondii co-infection in a cord blood transplant recipient

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Abstract

Background: The case of a central nervous system human herpes virus type 6 (HHV-6) and Toxoplasma gondii co-infection after an umbilical cord blood transplantation in a chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia patient is reported. Case report: A 65-year-old Caucasian man underwent an umbilical cord blood transplantation within the context of chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. On day 37 post-graft, he presented with a severe headache; PCRs of cerebrospinal fluid and blood were positive for T. gondii and HHV-6. The patient was treated with pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine associated with ganciclovir. Conclusion: HHV-6 reactivation can trigger a reactivation of T. gondii. This case suggests that patients who are seropositive for T. gondii and who present with HHV-6 reactivation should be monitored closely for toxoplasmosis.

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APA

Chapuis, A., Chabrot, C., Mirand, A., Poirier, P., & Nourrisson, C. (2016). Encephalitis caused by an unusual human herpes virus type 6 and Toxoplasma gondii co-infection in a cord blood transplant recipient. International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 46, 79–81. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2016.04.002

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