Energy costs of catfish space use as determined by biotelemetry

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Abstract

Animals use dispersed resources within their home range (HR) during regular day-to-day activities. The high-quality area intensively used by an individual, where critical resources are concentrated, has been designated as the core area (CA). This study aimed to describe how animals utilize energy in the HR and CA assuming that changes would occur according to the size of the used areas. We observed energetic costs of space use in the largest European freshwater predator catfish, Silurus glanis, using physiological sensors. Catfish consumed significantly more energy within the CA compared to the rest of the HR area. In addition, energetic costs of space use within a large area were lower. These results generally indicate that utilization of larger areas is related to less demanding activities, such as patrolling and searching for new resources and mates. In contrast, fish occurrence in small areas appears to be related to energetically demanding use of spatially limited resources. © 2014 Slavík et al.

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Slavík, O., Horký, P., & Závorka, L. (2014). Energy costs of catfish space use as determined by biotelemetry. PLoS ONE, 9(6). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0098997

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