An enhanced PM2.5 air quality forecast model based on nonlinear regression and back-trajectory concentrations

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Abstract

An enhanced PM2.5 air quality forecast model based on nonlinear regression (NLR) and back-trajectory concentrations has been developed for use in the Louisville, Kentucky metropolitan area. The PM2.5 air quality forecast model is designed for use in the warm season, from May through September, when PM2.5 air quality is more likely to be critical for human health. The enhanced PM2.5 model consists of a basic NLR model, developed for use with an automated air quality forecast system, and an additional parameter based on upwind PM2.5 concentration, called PM24. The PM24 parameter is designed to be determined manually, by synthesizing backward air trajectory and regional air quality information to compute 24-h back-trajectory concentrations. The PM24 parameter may be used by air quality forecasters to adjust the forecast provided by the automated forecast system. In this study of the 2007 and 2008 forecast seasons, the enhanced model performed well using forecasted meteorological data and PM24 as input. The enhanced PM2.5 model was compared with three alternative models, including the basic NLR model, the basic NLR model with a persistence parameter added, and the NLR model with persistence and PM24. The two models that included PM24 were of comparable accuracy. The two models incorporating back-trajectory concentrations had lower mean absolute errors and higher rates of detecting unhealthy PM2.5 concentrations compared to the other models. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

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Cobourn, W. G. (2010). An enhanced PM2.5 air quality forecast model based on nonlinear regression and back-trajectory concentrations. Atmospheric Environment, 44(25), 3015–3023. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.05.009

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