Epstein-Barr virus genome load is increased by therapeutic vaccination in HIV-l carriers, and further enhanced in patients with a history of symptomatic primary infection

4Citations
Citations of this article
12Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Objective: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is an established risk factor for B-cell lymphomas in Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infected patients. A disturbed EBV-host relationship is seen in patient groups with a high risk for EBV-associated lymphomas. We have analysed this relationship by measuring EBV-DNA in the blood of HIV-1 carriers. Method: EBV-DNA load in B-cells was monitored by PCR in non- or insufficiently antiretroviral treated and rgp160-vaccinated HIV-patients. Results: Both asymptomatic HIV-infected and AIDS-patients showed a 25-40-fold increase in the number of B cell associated EBV-DNA copies compared to healthy controls. Patients included in a vaccine trial with recombinant HIV gp160 showed a 5-fold increase of EBV load compared to non-immunised patients and a 50-fold increase compared to healthy controls. There was no difference whether they received vaccine or " placebo" . Vaccinated patients with a history of symptomatic primary HIV-1 infection (PHI) had a 280-fold increase in median EBV load compared to healthy controls, thus suggesting a synergistic effect between the vaccination and PHI, which hypothetically could affect lymphoma risk. Conclusions: We recommend analysis of EBV-load and long term follow up of lymphoma risk in all therapeutic HIV-1 vaccination trials. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Friis, A. M. C., Åkerlund, B., Gyllensten, K., Aleman, A., Bratt, G., Sandström, E., & Ernberg, I. (2012). Epstein-Barr virus genome load is increased by therapeutic vaccination in HIV-l carriers, and further enhanced in patients with a history of symptomatic primary infection. Vaccine, 30(42), 6093–6098. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2012.07.041

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free