An Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Protein Complex Requires an Origin of Lytic Replication In Cis to Mediate Late Gene Transcription

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Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus lytic replication is accomplished by an intricate cascade of gene expres-sion that integrates viral DNA replication and structural protein synthesis. Most genes encoding structural proteins exhibit " true " late kinetics–their expression is strictly dependent on lytic DNA replication. Recently, the EBV BcRF1 gene was reported to encode a TATA box binding protein homolog, which preferentially recognizes the TATT sequence found in true late gene promoters. BcRF1 is one of seven EBV genes with homologs found in other β-and γ-, but not in α-herpesviruses. Using EBV BACmids, we systematically disrupted

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Djavadian, R., Chiu, Y. F., & Johannsen, E. (2016). An Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Protein Complex Requires an Origin of Lytic Replication In Cis to Mediate Late Gene Transcription. PLoS Pathogens, 12(6). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1005718

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