Ethnic variations in asthma hospital admission, readmission and death: A retrospective, national cohort study of 4.62 million people in Scotland

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Abstract

© 2016 Sheikh et al. Background: Our previous meta-analysis found that South Asians and Blacks in the UK were at a substantially increased risk of hospital admission from asthma. These estimates were, however, derived from pooling data from a limited number of now dated studies, confined to only three very broad ethnic groups (i.e. Whites, South Asians and Blacks) and failed to take account of possible sex-related differences in outcomes within these ethnic groups. We undertook the first study investigating ethnic variations in asthma outcomes across an entire population. Methods: This retrospective 9-year cohort study linked Scotland's hospitalisation/death records on asthma to the 2001 census (providing ethnic group). We calculated age, country of birth and Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation adjusted incident rate ratios (IRRs) for hospitalisation or death by sex for the period May 2001-2010. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for asthma readmission and subsequent asthma death. Results: We were able to link data on 4.62 million people (91.8% of the Scottish population), yielding over 38 million patient-years of data, 1,845 asthma deaths, 113,795 first asthma admissions, and 107,710 readmissions (40,075 of which were for asthma). There were substantial ethnic variations in the rate of hospitalisation/death in both males and females. When compared to the reference Scottish White population, the highest age-adjusted rates were in Pakistani males (IRR = 1.59; 95% CI, 1.30-1.94) and females (IRR = 1.50; 95% CI, 1.06-2.11) and Indian males (IRR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.16-1.54), and the lowest were seen in Chinese males (IRR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.41-0.94) and females (IRR = 0.49; 95% CI, 0.39-0.61). Conclusion: There are very substantial ethnic variations in hospital admission/deaths from asthma in Scotland, with Pakistanis having the worst and Chinese having the best outcomes. Cultural factors, including self-management and health seeking behaviours, and variations in the quality of primary care provision are the most likely explanations for these differences and these now need to be formally investigated.

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Sheikh, A., Steiner, M. F. C., Cezard, G., Bansal, N., Fischbacher, C., Simpson, C. R., … Bhopal, R. (2016). Ethnic variations in asthma hospital admission, readmission and death: A retrospective, national cohort study of 4.62 million people in Scotland. BMC Medicine, 14(1), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-015-0546-6

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