Ethnicity and risk factors for change in the ankle-brachial index: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

29Citations
Citations of this article
29Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for conversion from a normal to either a low or high ankle-brachial index (ABI). Methods: Participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis who had two separate measurements of the ABI over a 3-year time period were assessed. Results: At baseline, the mean age was 62 years and 50% were women, 28% African American, 12% Chinese, 22% Hispanic and 38% non-Hispanic White. Of the 5514 participants with a baseline ABI between 0.90 and 1.40, 89 (1.6%) had an ABI ≤ 0.90 ("low ABI group") and 71 (1.3%) had an ABI ≥ 1.40 ("high ABI group") 3 years later. On multivariable analysis, the odds for having progressed into the low ABI group were significantly increased for higher baseline age, hypertension, diabetes, greater pack-years of cigarette smoking, and homocysteine levels. The odds for progression into the high ABI group were increased for male gender and higher body mass index. Compared with non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans had a significantly higher odds for progression to the low ABI group (odds ratio [OR]: 2.24, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.29-3.88) while having a reduced odds for progression to the high ABI group (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.24-1.00). Neither Chinese nor Hispanic ethnicity was significantly associated with progression to either ABI group. Conclusions: The risk factors for progression to a low or high ABI were distinct and African Americans were at increased risk for progression to a low ABI but at decreased risk for progression into the high ABI group. © 2009 Society for Vascular Surgery.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Allison, M. A., Cushman, M., Solomon, C., Aboyans, V., McDermott, M. M., Goff, D. C., & Criqui, M. H. (2009). Ethnicity and risk factors for change in the ankle-brachial index: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 50(5), 1049–1056. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2009.05.061

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free