Etiologic and epidemiologic analysis of hand, foot, and mouth disease in Guangzhou city: A review of 4,753 cases

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Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to review etiological and epidemiological data for hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) cases that occurred between 2008 and 2010 in Guangzhou City, to help develop and implement precautionary measures applicable for future outbreaks. Methods: The characteristics of 4,753 HFMD episodes were retrospectively reviewed in 4,636 patients reported between 2008 and 2010 by the Guangdong Women and Children's Hospital, which is the national enterovirus monitoring agent and the designated hospital in China for treating severe HFMD. Results: Out of 4,753 incident episodes reviewed, 525 patients were hospitalized; 60% were males. Most patients (93.8%) were children under 5 years old, with a median age at onset of 2.4 years. HFMD incidence peaked in April/May and September/October. From the total, 1,067 (22.4%) infections were positive for human enterovirus 71 (HEV71), 1,094 (23.0%) were positive for coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), and 941 (19.8%) were positive for other common enteroviruses. In contrast, 1,666 (35.0%) cases were negative to HEV71, CA16, and other common enteroviruses. Cross-correlation coefficients demonstrated associations between the number of cases, seasonal temperatures, and humidity. Among hospitalized cases, HEV71 was positive in 261 (24.5%), and 42 (3.9%) critical cases were positive for HEV71. Conclusion: Seasonal fluctuations and HEV71 and CA16 were the two key factors influencing the Guangzhou HFMD epidemic. The infection predominantly affected children younger than 5 years old. © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda.

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Zou, X. ni, Zhang, X. zhuang, Wang, B., & Qiu, Y. teng. (2012). Etiologic and epidemiologic analysis of hand, foot, and mouth disease in Guangzhou city: A review of 4,753 cases. Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 16(5), 457–465. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjid.2012.08.001

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