Cultivating hybrid collectives: research methods for enacting community food economies in Australia and the Philippines

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Abstract

Across the globe, groups are experimenting with initiatives to create alternatives to the dominant food system. What role might research play in helping to strengthen and multiply these initiatives? In this paper we discuss two research projects in Australia and the Philippines in which we have cultivated hybrid collectives of academic researchers, lay researchers and various non-human others with the intention of enacting community food economies. We feature three critical interactions in the "hybrid collective research method": gathering, which brings together those who share concerns about community food economies; reassembling, in which material gathered is deliberatively rebundled to amplify particular insights; and translating, by which reassembled ideas are taken up by other collectives so they may continue to "do work". We argue that in a climate-changing world, the hybrid collective research method fosters opportunities for a range of human and non-human participants to act in concert to build community food economies. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

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APA

Cameron, J., Gibson, K., & Hill, A. (2014). Cultivating hybrid collectives: research methods for enacting community food economies in Australia and the Philippines. Local Environment, 19(1), 118–132. https://doi.org/10.1080/13549839.2013.855892

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