Role of color doppler imaging in early diagnosis and prediction of progression in glaucoma

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Abstract

This longitudinal and prospective study analyzes the ability of orbital blood flow measured by color Doppler imaging (CDI) to predict glaucoma progression in patients with glaucoma risk factors. Patients with normal perimetry but having glaucoma risk factors and patients in the initial phase of glaucoma were prospectively included in the study and divided, after a five-year follow-up, into two groups: "Progression" and "No Progression" based on the changes in the Moorfields regression analysis (MRA) classification of Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT). An orbital CDI was performed in all patients and the parameters obtained were correlated with changes in HRT. A logistic discrimination function (LDF) was calculated for ophthalmic artery (OA) and central retinal artery (CRA) parameters. Receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC) were used to assess the usefulness of LDFs to predict glaucomatous progression. A total of 71 eyes were included. End-diastolic velocity, time-averaged velocity, and resistive index in the OA and CRA were significantly different (P<0.05) between the Progression and No Progression groups. The area under the ROC curves calculated for both LDFs was of 0.695 (OA) and 0.624 (CRA). More studies are needed to evaluate the ability of CDI to perform early diagnosis and to predict progression in glaucoma in eyes. © 2013 Fatima Jimenez-Aragon et al.

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Jimenez-Aragon, F., Garcia-Martin, E., Larrosa-Lopez, R., Artigas-Martín, J. M., Seral-Moral, P., & Pablo, L. E. (2013). Role of color doppler imaging in early diagnosis and prediction of progression in glaucoma. BioMed Research International, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/871689

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