MEDICAL AUDIT AND GENERAL PRACTICE

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Abstract

If some form of quality control of medical care is to be set up, it is better done via a flexible system run by doctors themselves than via a rigid organisation which would be the likely result of monitoring by Government agencies. Medical audit poses immense problems in general practice -in particular, measurement is difficult, criteria of quality are not agreed, and outcome is hard to assess. What is needed at this stage is a research programme, and in general practice it might be wise to concentrate in the first place on procedures within the consultation ("process") and on results of treatment (" outcome ") and considerations of outcome might concentrate, as a first step, on a limited number of conditions and on the patient's physical (rather than mental or social) health. © 1975.

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APA

Acheson, H. W. K. (1975). MEDICAL AUDIT AND GENERAL PRACTICE. The Lancet, 305(7905), 511–513. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(75)92846-9

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