Xylose and cellobiose fermentation to ethanol by the thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha

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Abstract

Wild-type strains of the thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha are able to ferment glucose, cellobiose and xylose to ethanol. H. polymorpha most actively fermented sugars to ethanol at 37°C, whereas the well-known xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis could not effectively ferment carbon substrates at this temperature. H. polymorpha even could ferment both glucose and xylose up to 45°C. This species appeared to be more ethanol tolerant than P. stipitis but more susceptible than Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A riboflavin-deficient mutant of H. polymorpha increased its ethanol productivity from glucose and xylose under suboptimal supply with riboflavin. Mutants of H. polymorpha defective in alcohol dehydrogenase activity produced lower amounts of ethanol from glucose, whereas levels of ethanol production from xylose were identical for the wild-type strain and the alcohol dehydrogenase-defective mutant. © 2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Ryabova, O. B., Chmil, O. M., & Sibirny, A. A. (2003). Xylose and cellobiose fermentation to ethanol by the thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha. FEMS Yeast Research, 4(2 SPEC.ISS.), 157–164. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1567-1356(03)00146-6

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