Interferon induction by RNA viruses and antagonism by viral pathogens

24Citations
Citations of this article
88Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Interferons are a group of small proteins that play key roles in host antiviral innate immunity. Their induction mainly relies on host pattern recognition receptors (PRR). Host PRR for RNA viruses include Toll-like receptors (TLR) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) like receptors (RLR). Activation of both TLR and RLR pathways can eventually lead to the secretion of type I IFNs, which can modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses against viral pathogens. Because of the important roles of interferons, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade host TLR and RLR mediated signaling. This review focuses on the mechanisms of interferon induction and antagonism of the antiviral strategy by RNA viruses.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Nan, Y., Nan, G., & Zhang, Y. J. (2014, December 12). Interferon induction by RNA viruses and antagonism by viral pathogens. Viruses. MDPI AG. https://doi.org/10.3390/v6124999

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free