Non-participation in chlamydia screening in the Netherlands: Determinants associated with young people's intention to participate in chlamydia screening

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Abstract

Background: In the Netherlands, a national chlamydia screening program started in 2008, but the participation was low and the screening was not cost-effective. This study aimed to explore unconscious and conscious associations with chlamydia screening (16-29 year-olds). In addition, we examined whether information presented in chlamydia screening invitation letters had an effect on the evaluation of these determinants compared to a no-letter group. Methods. An Internet survey was conducted that included self-report measures of attitude, susceptibility, severity, unrealistic optimism, subjective, moral, and descriptive norm, perceived behavioral control, outcome expectations, barriers, intention, and a response time measure to assess unconscious associations of chlamydia screening with annoyance, threat and reassurance. Results: On the unconscious level, participants (N = 713) who received no information letter associated testing for chlamydia with annoyance and threat, but also with reassurance (all p's

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Ten Hoor, G. A., Ruiter, R. A. C., Van Bergen, J. E. A. M., Hoebe, C. J. P. A., Houben, K., & Kok, G. (2013). Non-participation in chlamydia screening in the Netherlands: Determinants associated with young people’s intention to participate in chlamydia screening. BMC Public Health, 13(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-13-1091

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