The localization of neuronal nitric oxide synthase may influence its role in neuronal precursor proliferation and synaptic maintenance

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Abstract

Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is implicated in some developmental processes, including neuronal survival, differentiation, and precursor proliferation. To define the roles of nNOS in neuronal development, we utilized the olfactory system as a model. We hypothesized that the role of nNOS may be influenced by its localization. nNOS expression was developmentally regulated in the olfactory system. During early postnatal development, nNOS was expressed in developing neurons in the olfactory epithelium (OE), while in the adult its expression was restricted to periglomerular (PG) cells in the olfactory bulb (OB). At postnatal week 1 (P1W), loss of nNOS due to targeted gene deletion resulted in a decrease in immature neurons in the OE due to decreased proliferation of neuronal precursors. While the pool of neuronal precursors and neurogenesis normalized in the nNOS null mouse by P6W, there was an overgrowth of mitral or tufted cells dendrites and a decreased number of active synapses in the OB. Cyclic GMP (cGMP) immunostaining was reduced in the OE and in the glomeruli of the OB at early postnatal and adult ages, respectively. Our results suggest that nNOS appears necessary for neurogenesis in the OE during early postnatal development and for glomerular organization in the OB in the adult. Thus, the location of nNOS, either within cell bodies or perisynaptically, may influence its developmental role. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Chen, J., Tu, Y., Moon, C., Matarazzo, V., Palmer, A. M., & Ronnett, G. V. (2004). The localization of neuronal nitric oxide synthase may influence its role in neuronal precursor proliferation and synaptic maintenance. Developmental Biology, 269(1), 165–182. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2004.01.024

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