Economic values for production traits of Morada Nova meat sheep in a pasture based production system in semi-arid Brazil

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Abstract

Economic values were estimated for meat sheep raised in a pasture based production system in semi-arid Brazil using data on the Morada Nova hair sheep breed. The traits considered were lambing percentage (LP), litter size (LS), lamb mortality (LM), yearling mortality (YM), ewe and ram mortality (AM), female slaughter weight (FSW), male slaughter weight (MSW), ewe adult weight (EAW), ram adult weight (RW), carcass yield (CY), number of lambings per year (NLY), age at first lambing (AFL) and number of anthelminthic doses used per year (AC). The economic values were estimated using the profit equation (profit = revenue - costs) after a one unit and 1% increase of each trait, keeping all other traits at their mean value. With a 1% increase in the traits, the economic values (US$ per ewe per year) for LP, LM, MSW, CY and NLY were 0.781, -0.138, 0.416, 0.827 and 0.781, respectively. The production system with Morada Nova sheep grazing native " caatinga" pasture in Brazilian Northeast, exclusively for meat production, is profitable when taking into account all costs of production, including that of family labour. Carcass yield was shown to be an important selection objective. As it is expressed when the animal is slaughtered, further studies need to be carried out with this population to aid in the choice of appropriate selection criteria for the improvement of this trait. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

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Lôbo, R. N. B., Pereira, I. D. C., Facó, O., & McManus, C. M. (2011). Economic values for production traits of Morada Nova meat sheep in a pasture based production system in semi-arid Brazil. Small Ruminant Research, 96(2–3), 93–100. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.smallrumres.2011.01.009

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