FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH MORE WEIGHT LOSS AFTER INTENSIVE DIETARY INTERVENTION

  • Kostis J
  • Liu J
  • Cabrera J
  • et al.
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Abstract

Background: Obesity and over-weight are associated with increased risk of hypertension. Although weight loss is an important non-pharmacologic intervention for hypertension, it is not easy to predict which patients will be successful in loosing weight. Methods: We examined clinical data and polymorphisms associated with the amount of weight loss in hypertensive patients who were randomized to the intensive weight loss intervention in the Trial of Nonpharmacologic Intervention in the Elderly (TONE). The relationship between the percentage body mass index (BMI) change to gender, age, baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP), diabetes, smoking, history of stroke, chronic kidney disease (CKD), habitual exercise patterns and 21 candidate polymorphisms was explored using multiple regression. Results: Using two directional step-wise variable selection, we identified models with highest power (R2) to predict the magnitude of the weight loss. Male gender, older age and light or moderate physical activity (vs. no habitual physical activity) as well as rs5443 and rs1800896 were associated with more weight loss after a 3 month intensive dietary intervention. Conclusions: Male gender, age, SBP, CKD and habitual exercise as well as polymorphisms associated with hypertension and obesity (rs5443 related to guanine nucleotide binding protein 3) and inflammation (rs1800896 related to interleukin 10) are associated with greater weight loss after an intensive dietary intervention. (Table Presented).

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Kostis, J. B., Liu, J., Cabrera, J., Cheng, J. Q., & Kostis, W. J. (2014). FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH MORE WEIGHT LOSS AFTER INTENSIVE DIETARY INTERVENTION. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 63(12), A1358. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0735-1097(14)61358-9

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