How to project onto an isotone projection cone

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Abstract

The solution of the complementarity problem defined by a mapping f : Rn → Rn and a cone K ⊂ Rn consists of finding the fixed points of the operator PK {ring operator} (I - f), where PK is the projection onto the cone K and I stands for the identity mapping. For the class of isotone projection cones (cones admitting projections isotone with respect to the order relation they generate) and f satisfying certain monotonicity properties, the solution can be obtained by iterative processes (see G. Isac, A.B. Németh, Projection methods, isotone projection cones, and the complementarity problem, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 153(1) (1990) 258-275 and S.Z. Németh, Iterative methods for nonlinear complementarity problems on isotone projection cones, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 350(1) (2009) 340-347). These algorithms require computing at each step the projection onto the cone K. In general, computing the projection mapping onto a cone K is a difficult and computationally expensive problem. In this note it is shown that the projection of an arbitrary point onto an isotone projection cone in Rn can be obtained by projecting recursively at most n - 1 times into subspaces of decreasing dimension. This emphasizes the efficiency of the algorithms mentioned above and furnishes a handy tool for some problems involving special isotone projection cones, as for example the non-negative monotone cones occurring in reconstruction problems (see e.g. Section 5.13 in J. Dattorro, Convex Optimization and Euclidean Distance Geometry, Meboo, 2005, v2009.04.11). © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Németh, A. B., & Németh, S. Z. (2010). How to project onto an isotone projection cone. Linear Algebra and Its Applications, 433(1), 41–51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.laa.2010.02.008

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