Fingerprint analysis and identification of strains ST309 as a potential high risk clone in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa population isolated from children with bacteremia in Mexico City

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Abstract

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and is associated with nosocomial infections. Its ability to thrive in a broad range of environments is due to a large and diverse genome of which its accessory genome is part. The objective of this study was to characterize P. aeruginosa strains isolated from children who developed bacteremia, using pulse-field gel electrophoresis, and in terms of its genomic islands, virulence genes, multilocus sequence type, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Our results showed that P. aeruginosa strains presented the seven virulence genes: toxA, lasB, lecA, algR, plcH, phzA1, and toxR, a type IV pilin alleles (TFP) group I or II. Additionally, we detected a novel pilin and accessory gene, expanding the number of TFP alleles to group VI. All strains presented the PAPI-2 Island and the majority were exoU+ and exoS+ genotype. Ten percent of the strains were multi-drug resistant phenotype, 18% extensively drug-resistant, 68% moderately resistant and only 3% were susceptible to all the antimicrobial tested. The most prevalent acquired β-Lactamase was KPC. We identified a group of ST309 strains, as a potential high risk clone. Our finding also showed that the strains isolated from patients with bacteremia have important virulence factors involved in colonization and dissemination as: a TFP group I or II; the presence of the exoU gene within the PAPI-2 island and the presence of the exoS gene.

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Morales-Espinosa, R., Delgado, G., Espinosa, L. F., Isselo, D., Méndez, J. L., Rodriguez, C., … Cravioto, A. (2017). Fingerprint analysis and identification of strains ST309 as a potential high risk clone in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa population isolated from children with bacteremia in Mexico City. Frontiers in Microbiology, 8(MAR). https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2017.00313

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