First measurements of nitrous oxide self-broadening and self-shift coefficients in the 0002-0000 band at 2.26 μm using high resolution Fourier transform spectroscopy

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Abstract

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the most important greenhouse gases in the terrestrial atmosphere and is routinely measured with ground-based FTIR networks like the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). A spectral window for the TCCON retrievals is the 14N216O 0002-0000-band region from 4375 to 4445 cm-1 (2.250-2.285 μm). In our study, we present the first high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer measurements of self-broadening and self-shift coefficients in the range of 53-1019 hPa for the lines R0e-R40e of this band. The line parameters were determined at 296 K using metrologically validated temperature, and pressure values, which were traced back to the SI-units. The averaged estimated relative uncertainties for the coverage factor of k = 2 (two times the standard deviation) are 0.3% and 9.5% with a standard deviation of 0.1% and 5.3% for the self-broadening and the self-shift coefficients, respectively. Vacuum line positions, determined for the first time by taking the self-shift coefficients into account are also reported with an estimated averaged relative uncertainty of 1.1 ∗ 10-8 for k = 2 and a standard deviation of 3 ∗ 10-9. A well-defined uncertainty assessment for the measured line parameters is given.

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Werwein, V., Brunzendorf, J., Serdyukov, A., Werhahn, O., & Ebert, V. (2016). First measurements of nitrous oxide self-broadening and self-shift coefficients in the 0002-0000 band at 2.26 μm using high resolution Fourier transform spectroscopy. Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy, 323, 28–42. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jms.2016.01.010

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