FLN-1/Filamin is required for maintenance of actin and exit of fertilized oocytes from the spermatheca in C. elegans

24Citations
Citations of this article
38Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Filamin, known primarily for its actin cross-linking function, is a stretch-sensitive structural and signaling scaffold that binds transmembrane receptors and a wide variety of intracellular signaling proteins. The Caenorhabditis elegans filamin ortholog, FLN-1, has a well conserved overall structure, including an N-terminal actin-binding domain, and a series of 20 immunoglobulin (Ig)-like repeats. FLN-1 partially colocalizes with actin filaments in spermathecal and uterine cells. Analysis of phenotypes resulting from a deletion allele and RNAi depletion indicates FLN-1 is required to maintain the actin cytoskeleton in the spermatheca and uterus, and to allow the exit of embryos from the spermatheca. FLN-1 deficient animals accumulate embryos in the spermatheca, lay damaged and unfertilized eggs, and consequently exhibit dramatically reduced brood sizes. The phospholipase PLC-1 is also required for the exit of embryos from the spermatheca, and analysis of doubly mutant animals suggests that PLC-1 and FLN-1 act in the same pathway to promote proper transit of embryos from the spermatheca to the uterus. Given the modular protein structure, subcellular localization, genetic interaction with PLC-1, and known mechanosensory functions of filamin, we postulate that FLN-1 may be required to convert mechanical information about the presence of the oocyte into a biochemical signal, thereby allowing timely exit of the embryo from the spermatheca. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Kovacevic, I., & Cram, E. J. (2010). FLN-1/Filamin is required for maintenance of actin and exit of fertilized oocytes from the spermatheca in C. elegans. Developmental Biology, 347(2), 247–257. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2010.08.005

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free