Fulminant cerebral infarction of anterior and posterior cerebral circulation after ascending type of facial necrotizing fasciitis

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Abstract

Necrotizing fasciitis is a soft tissue infection that is characterized by extensive necrosis of the subcutaneous fat, neurovascular structures, and fascia. Cerebral infarction after facial necrotizing fasciitis has been rarely reported. A 61-year-old woman with diabetes was admitted with painful swelling of her right cheek. One day later, she was stuporous and quadriplegic. A computed tomographic scan of her face revealed right facial infection in the periorbital soft tissue, parotid, buccal muscle, and maxillary sinusitis. A computed tomographic scan of the brain revealed cerebral infarction in the right hemisphere, left frontal area, and both cerebellum. Four days later, she died from cerebral edema and septic shock. Involvement of the cerebral vasculature, such as the carotid or vertebral artery by necrotizing fasciitis, can cause cerebral infarction. Facial necrotizing fasciitis should be treated early with surgical treatment and the appropriate antibiotic therapy. © 2014 by National Stroke Association.

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Lee, J. H., Choi, H. C., Kim, C., Sohn, J. H., & Kim, H. C. (2014). Fulminant cerebral infarction of anterior and posterior cerebral circulation after ascending type of facial necrotizing fasciitis. Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, 23(1), 173–175. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2012.07.013

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