Functional identification of electrogenic Na+-translocating ATPase in the plasma membrane of the halotolerant microalga Dunaliella maritima

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Abstract

The hypothesis that the primary Na+-pump, Na+-ATPase, functions in the plasma membrane (PM) of halotolerant microalga Dunaliella maritima was tested using membrane preparations from this organism enriched with the PM vesicles. The pH profile of ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the PM fractions exhibited a broad optimum between pH 6 and 9. Hydrolysis in the alkaline range was specifically stimulated by Na+ ions. Maximal sodium dependent ATP hydrolysis was observed at pH 7.5-8.0. On the assumption that the ATP-hydrolysis at alkaline pH values is related to a Na+-ATPase activity, we investigated two ATP-dependent processes, sodium uptake by the PM vesicles and generation of electric potential difference (Δψ) across the vesicle membrane. PM vesicles from D. maritima were found to be able to accumulate 22Na+ upon ATP addition, with an optimum at pH 7.5-8.0. The ATP-dependent Na+ accumulation was stimulated by the permeant NO3- anion and the protonophore CCCP, and inhibited by orthovanadate. The sodium accumulation was accompanied by pronounced Δψ generation across the vesicle membrane. The data obtained indicate that a primary Na + pump, an electrogenic Na+-ATPase of the P-type, functions in the PM of marine microalga D. maritima. © 2005 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Popova, L. G., Shumkova, G. A., Andreev, I. M., & Balnokin, Y. V. (2005). Functional identification of electrogenic Na+-translocating ATPase in the plasma membrane of the halotolerant microalga Dunaliella maritima. FEBS Letters, 579(22), 5002–5006. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.febslet.2005.07.087

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