Gender-related asymmetric brain vasomotor response to color stimulation: A functional transcranial Doppler spectroscopy study

2Citations
Citations of this article
9Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The present study was designed to examine the effects of color stimulation on cerebral blood mean flow velocity (MFV) in men and women.<br /><br />METHODS: The study included 16 (8 men and 8 women) right-handed healthy subjects. The MFV was recorded simultaneously in both right and left middle cerebral arteries in Dark and white Light conditions, and during color (Blue, Yellow and Red) stimulations, and was analyzed using functional transcranial Doppler spectroscopy (fTCDS) technique.<br /><br />RESULTS: Color processing occurred within cortico-subcortical circuits. In men, wavelength-differencing of Yellow/Blue pairs occurred within the right hemisphere by processes of cortical long-term depression (CLTD) and subcortical long-term potentiation (SLTP). Conversely, in women, frequency-differencing of Blue/Yellow pairs occurred within the left hemisphere by processes of cortical long-term potentiation (CLTP) and subcortical long-term depression (SLTD). In both genders, there was luminance effect in the left hemisphere, while in men it was along an axis opposite (orthogonal) to that of chromatic effect, in women, it was parallel.<br /><br />CONCLUSION: Gender-related differences in color processing demonstrated a right hemisphere cognitive style for wavelength-differencing in men, and a left hemisphere cognitive style for frequency-differencing in women. There are potential applications of fTCDS technique, for stroke rehabilitation and monitoring of drug effects.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Njemanze, P. C. (2010). Gender-related asymmetric brain vasomotor response to color stimulation: A functional transcranial Doppler spectroscopy study. Experimental and Translational Stroke Medicine, 2(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/2040-7378-2-21

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free