Gradients of the Drosophila Chinmo BTB-Zinc Finger Protein Govern Neuronal Temporal Identity

135Citations
Citations of this article
129Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Many neural progenitors, including Drosophila mushroom body (MB) and projection neuron (PN) neuroblasts, sequentially give rise to different subtypes of neurons throughout development. We identified a novel BTB-zinc finger protein, named Chinmo (Chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis), that governs neuronal temporal identity during postembryonic development of the Drosophila brain. In both MB and PN lineages, loss of Chinmo autonomously causes early-born neurons to adopt the fates of late-born neurons from the same lineages. Interestingly, primarily due to a posttranscriptional control, MB neurons born at early developmental stages contain more abundant Chinmo than their later-born siblings. Further, the temporal identity of MB progeny can be transformed toward earlier or later fates by reducing or increasing Chinmo levels, respectively. Taken together, we suggest that a temporal gradient of Chinmo (Chinmo high → Chinmo low ) helps specify distinct birth order-dependent cell fates in an extended neuronal lineage. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Zhu, S., Lin, S., Kao, C. F., Awasaki, T., Chiang, A. S., & Lee, T. (2006). Gradients of the Drosophila Chinmo BTB-Zinc Finger Protein Govern Neuronal Temporal Identity. Cell, 127(2), 409–422. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2006.08.045

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free