Guarding embryo development of zebrafish by shell engineering: A strategy to shield life from ozone depletion

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Abstract

Background: The reduced concentration of stratospheric ozone results in an increased flux of biologically damaging midultraviolet radiation (UVB, 280 to 320 nm) reaching earth surfaces. Environmentally relevant levels of UVB negatively impact various natural populations of marine organisms, which is ascribed to suppressed embryonic development by increased radiation. Methodology/Principal Findings: Inspired by strategies in the living systems generated by evolution, we induce an extra UVB-adsorbed coat on the chorion (eggshell surrounding embryo) of zebrafish, during the blastula period. Short and long UV exposure experiments show that the artificial mineral-shell reduces the UV radiation effectively and the enclosed embryos become more robust. In contrast, the uncoated embryos cannot survive under the enhanced UVB condition. Conclusions: We suggest that an engineered shell of functional materials onto biological units can be developed as a strategy to shield lives to counteract negative changes of global environment, or to provide extra protection for the living units in biological research. © 2010 Wang et al.

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Wang, B., Liu, P., Tang, Y., Pan, H., Xu, X., & Tang, R. (2010). Guarding embryo development of zebrafish by shell engineering: A strategy to shield life from ozone depletion. PLoS ONE, 5(4). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0009963

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