Health and Functional Status of Adults with Intellectual Disability Referred to the Specialist Health Care Setting: A Five-Year Experience

  • Lee L
  • Rianto J
  • Raykar V
  • et al.
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Abstract

Aims and Method. The Developmental Disability Database in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at a metropolitan hospital was audited for observations on adults with Intellectual Disability living in the local region (total population 180,000) who were seen in an identified multidisciplinary specialist clinic, during 2006–2010. Results. There were 162 people (representing half the known number of adults with Intellectual Disability living in the region): 77 females, 85 males, age range 16–86 years. The most common complex disabilities referred to the specialists in this clinic were epilepsy (52%), challenging or changing behavior (42%) and movement disorders (34%). Early onset dementia was a feature of the group (7%). The prevalence of prescription of medications for gastro-oesophageal reflux was high (36%) and similar to the numbers of people taking psychotropic medications. The rates of chronic cardiovascular disease (2%), chronic respiratory disease (10%) and generalised arthritis (11%) were low overall, but did rise with increasing age. Conclusions. Complex neurological disabilities are common, and chronic medical illnesses are uncommon in adults with Intellectual Disability referred to specialist clinicians in this region. A combined, coordinated, multidisciplinary clinic model addresses some of the barriers experienced by adults with Intellectual Disability in the secondary health system.

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APA

Lee, L., Rianto, J., Raykar, V., Creasey, H., Waite, L., Berry, A., … Naganathan, V. (2011). Health and Functional Status of Adults with Intellectual Disability Referred to the Specialist Health Care Setting: A Five-Year Experience. International Journal of Family Medicine, 2011, 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1155/2011/312492

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